Nineteen
boaters signed up for the Little River Canyon (LRC) trip. No
problem, there were several LRC veterans. We would break up into two
or three groups. However, it rained the Thursday before the trip. LRC
was rising fast. I told several boaters that I would cancel the trip
if it got to 1800 CFS. As the water was rising, boaters were
canceling. It got to 1750 CFS (6″ on the bridge) then started
back down.

We
ended up with seven boaters. Stephan Roberts was our lone canoe. In kayaks
were John Karry, Ben Whittle, Arthur Blankenship (Inflatable), Peter
Elkon, Dale Adams, and myself. Everyone was experienced and wanted to
run the Upper II. Several had run LRC before. The put-in for the
Upper II is a strenuous walk-in.

We
were definitely warmed up by the time we put on the river. Everyone
had good runs through Screaming Right Turn and Road Block. I ran
Humpty Dumpty while Dale explained the line to everyone. The bottom
hole hit me like a 2X4. Dale and John put on a clinic showing how the
rapid should be run. John looked like he hit a rock at the bottom
hole, but it still looked good!

The
next mile of continuous class III rapids was really pumping. Deep
Throat had a plume shooting up about 2′. It’s a pretty sight. Arthur
gave us a scare. His line through Deep Throat was great. But, the
hole at the bottom grabbed his inflatable and keep it a short time
while Arthur finished the rapid.

After
stopping for lunch, we continued with the Chair Lift Section. The
scenery was magnificent, as usual. The rapids in this section are
mostly in the first 2 miles. Circle Back, Eddy Hop, and Blue Hole
Memorial were fun. Bottleneck is a serious rapid at any level.
Everyone had good runs. Thanks to everyone for a great day.

On
a sad note, Dale Adams died the following Saturday on LRC. Dale loved
LRC and was eager to help others see it’s beauty. Dale was a kind,
reserved person who was always willing to help out. He asked if he
could help me lead this GCA trip. The paddling community has lost a
great person and a friend to anyone on the river. We miss him
already.

January
19, 1998.
by Dane White