You have to love Winter in Atlanta. We had a great day on the Lower Amicalola — sunny and 65 degrees with
1 foot of water in the Amicalola. One foot is a nice level for the
lower section of the Amicalola, a far cry from the .65 we experienced
on the recent January trip.

Our
group consisted of Jim Harvey (open canoe); Jeff Engel (open canoe);
Richard Whitener (open canoe), back for another try after the January
0.65 trip; Bronwyn Fowlkes (open canoe); David Ashley (kayak); Bob
Card (kayak) and Robert Anderson (kayak) all the way from Cleveland,
TN.; Ed Green (kayak) and friend all the way from Silva, NC; Ardie
Olson, C-boater extraordinaire, and yours truly in an open canoe.
This was a very strong and experienced group of boaters that needed
little guidance from me.

We
put-in just upstream of highway 53 at the Ranger’s house. Some paddled up-river to the pool
below the last rapid of the upper section. Here we had a chance to
warm up for Edge of the World, just a few hundred yards below the
bridge. At 1.0′ Edge of the World is still quite friendly, a long
class 3 at this level that can be run as a series of drops and
ledges. All members of the group had excellent runs of the Edge and
the class two technical rock garden below.

All
ran Off the Wall (a.k.a. Squeeze) and Split Rock (a.k.a. Lap) without
mishap. We ate at Split Rock and dallied around in the sun. All ran
Rooster Tail without problem, and very soon we were at the last rapid
of any note, the double ledges with the side-surfing hole. A few
played around the hole, but no one seemed to want to really jump in
and risk a swim.

We
again elected to use the Etowah take-out at Kelly Bridge Road. Wet road conditions made
the chance of getting stuck too much for me, so after Rooster Tail we
all had to face the task of making the long flat water paddle out.
Despite the length of this trip (8 miles plus or minus) we took out
around 4:30 p.m.

I
never tire of the Lower Amicalola, especially when you can catch it
at 1′ or better. It is too bad that this river does not have a
larger water shed so it could run for more than a few months every
year.

by Charles B.
Clark,
Trip Coordinator
Saturday, February 10, 1996